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Archive for the ‘ICANN’ Category

NATURE’S CHOICE Bark Smaller Then It’s Bite

Wednesday, December 23rd, 2009

       natures-choice

In the recent domain name dispute decision of Kim Laube & Company Inc. v. RareNames, WebReg FA1291282 (Nat. Arb. Forum December 22, 2009) a three member Panel was faced with a dispute over the domains www.natureschoice.com and www.natures-choice.com. Complainant sells pet grooming products and has a a trademark registration for the mark NATURE’S CHOICE. Respondent provided a response to the complaint and registered the disputed domains in 2002 and 2003.

Policy ¶ 4(a) of the ICANN UDRP rules requires that Complainant must prove each of the following three elements to obtain an order that the domain names should be cancelled or transferred: 1. the domain names registered by Respondent are identical or confusingly similar to a trademark or service mark in which Complainant has rights; 2. Respondent has no rights or legitimate interests in respect of the domain names; and 3. the domain names have been registered and is being used in bad faith.

The Panel addressed the first element of the analysis and explained that the domains were identical or confusingly similar to Complainant’s mark. Although Respondent argued that Complainant could not hold exclusive rights on the common words, the Panel dismissed this argument under this prong of analysis.

The Panel declined to address the second prong, directing its attention to the third prong. First the Panel noted that there was no evidence presented that Respondent’s registered the domains primarily for the purpose of disrupting Complainant’s business.  The Panel only paid serious attention to Policy ¶4(b)(i) and (iv). Those sections state:

For the purposes of Paragraph 4(a)(iii), the following circumstances, in particular but without limitation, if found by the Panel to be present, shall be evidence of the registration and use of a domain name in bad faith:

(i) circumstances indicating that you have registered or you have acquired the domain name primarily for the purpose of selling, renting, or otherwise transferring the domain name registration to the complainant who is the owner of the trademark or service mark or to a competitor of that complainant, for valuable consideration in excess of your documented out-of-pocket costs directly related to the domain name; or…

(iv) by using the domain name, you have intentionally attempted to attract, for commercial gain, Internet users to your web site or other on-line location, by creating a likelihood of confusion with the complainant’s mark as to the source, sponsorship, affiliation, or endorsement of your web site or location or of a product or service on your web site or location.

The Panel explained as follows:

Turning first to Policy ¶ 4(b)(i), Respondent states that its business is the acquisition then sale of domain names for profit.  The only important issue is whether Complainant can point to circumstances indicating that Respondent registered the names primarily for the purpose of selling, renting, or otherwise transferring the domain name registration to Complainant or to a competitor of Complainant.

Likewise, Policy ¶ 4(b)(iv) requires proof that Respondent for commercial gain; intentionally used the disputed domain name to attract web users; to an on-line location; by creating a likelihood of confusion with Complainant’s trademark as to the source, sponsorship, affiliation, or endorsement of that on-line location, or of a product or service at that location.

Once more, the key issue is whether Respondent can be said to have used the domain names in a way which intentionally created a likelihood of confusion with Complainant’s trademark.

The Panel recognized that there are other contrary decisions on this topic but noted that their view was that “proof of actual knowledge of a Complianant’s trademark rights is necessary.” The Panel explained that in the situations where there is a trademark with descriptive elements, then the onus rises on proof of knowledge. The Panel discounts the arguments put forth by Complainant of its common law rights, based on a lack of evidentiary support. The Panel concluded by noting:

Taking account of the inherently descriptive character of both the trademark and the disputed domain name, the degree to which either very similar domain names or identical domain names with different extensions have been registered/used by others, the lack of evidence that Respondent has habitually abused third party trademark rights, and all of the circumstances, the Panel finds that neither Policy ¶ 4(b) (i) or (iv) is made out.

Ultimately, the Panel found that Complainant had failed to prove up all three elements, and DENIED the request for transfer.

Kate Hudson Joins The List Of Celebs Getting Their Name Back

Wednesday, December 9th, 2009

      kate_hudson  kate_hudson-2

In the recent domain name dispute decision of Kate Hudson v. Fei Zhu FA1290319 (Nat. Arb. Forum, December 8, 2009) a three member Panel was faced with a dispute over the domain www.katehudson.com. Kate Hudson is the famous actress who has been in countless movies, and according to the decision has used her name commercially since 1999.  Respondent registered the domain in 2006 and  failed to respond to the Complaint.

Paragraph 4(a) of the ICANN UDRP Policy requires that Complainant must prove each of the following three elements to obtain an order that a domain name should be cancelled or transferred: (1) the domain name registered by Respondent is identical or confusingly similar to a trademark or service mark in which Complainant has rights; and (2) Respondent has no rights or legitimate interests in respect of the domain name; and (3) the domain name has been registered and is being used in bad faith.

In addressing the first element, the Panel noted that Kate Hudson did not have a federal trademark registration for her name, but reviewed the information provided to determine if she could establish secondary meaning in her common law rights. The Panel found that she had established those rights through continuos and extensive commercial use that predated the registration of the domain.  The Panel determined that the disputed domain was identical to the KATE HUDSON mark.

Moving to the second element, rights or legitimate interests, the Panel explained that Kate Hudson made out a prima facie case under this section of the Policy. As a result the Panel concluded that since the burden shifts to Respondent and Respondent failed to provide a response, then there was no evidence suggesting any rights or legitimate interests.

In addrrssing the final element, bad faith, the Panel noted that the disputed domain resolved to a parked web site with unrelated third-party links and adult oriented links. This was found to be bad faith, in and of itself. For these reasons, the Panel’s analysis stopped there.

Ultimately, the Panel found that all three elements were shown and ordered the domain be TRANSFERRED.

Panel Denies Claim For 3 Letter Domain, Finds Reverse Domain Name Hijacking

Monday, November 23rd, 2009

In the recent domain name dispute decision of Bin Shabib & Associates (BSA) LLP v. Hebei IT Shanghai ltd c/o Domain Administrator FA1287164 (Nat. Arb. Forum, November 19, 2009), a three member Panel was faced with a dispute over the domain www.bsa.com. Complainant is a law firm which operates in the United Arab Emirates and maintains a website at www.bsa.ae. Complainant claims rights to the BSA mark since based on two different dates, 2001 and 2007. Complainant filed for a trademark in the UAE, but has not yet received a registration. Respondent provided a Response, including an additional submission. The Panel noted that the Response was deficient for not being timely, but concluded to review the materials regardless.

Paragraph 4(a) of the ICANN UDRP Policy requires that the Complainant must prove each of the following three elements to obtain an order that a domain name should be cancelled or transferred: (1) the domain name registered by the Respondent is identical or confusingly similar to a trademark or service mark in which the Complainant has rights; (2) the Respondent has no rights or legitimate interests in respect of the domain name; and (3) the domain name has been registered and is being used in bad faith.

In addressing the first element, the Panel explained:

The Panel finds that Complainant has failed to establish registered trademark rights or common law rights in the BSA mark. Specifically, Complainant’s use of the BSA mark for less than two years has been too short, and Complainant has not shown any evidence of the sort that is usually used to establish that a mark has acquired secondary meaning. In light of Respondent’s arguments, the Panel finds that Complainant has failed to establish common law rights in the BSA mark pursuant to Policy ¶ 4(a)(i)….Having found that Complainant has not satisfied Policy ¶ 4(a)(i) because it has failed to establish rights in the mark, the Panel declines to analyze the other two elements of the Policy.

The Panel was not finished though, since it then addressed the issue of Reverse Domain Name Hijacking.

The panel finds that Complainant has failed to present any evidence to support its claimed rights in the disputed domain name. It only provided an application for trademark registration which does not establish any enforceable rights under the UDRP. It did not offer any evidence to support a finding of common law rights in the disputed mark. Also, the Panel finds that Complainant knew or should have known that it was unable to prove that Respondent lacks rights or legitimate interests in the disputed domain name or that Respondent registered and is using the disputed domain name in bad faith. Based on the foregoing, the panel finds that reverse domain name hijacking has occurred.

In light of the following, the Panel DENIED Complainant’s request to transfer the domain. and made a finding of reverse domain name hijacking.

MARY KAY Enriches It’s Domain Portfolio

Monday, November 16th, 2009

        marykay

In the recent domain name dispute decision of Mary Kay Inc. v. Open Water Enterprises Limited c/o Louis S FA1286701 (Nat. Arb Forum, November 12, 2009) a single member Panel was faced with a dispute over the domain www.mayrkay.com. Complainant Mary Kay is the well known manufacturer and distributor of body care and cosmetic products, with rights dating back to 1963. Complainant owns the mark MARY KAY and operates a web site at www.marykay.com. Respondent registered the disputed domain in 2003 and failed to respond to the Complaint.

Paragraph 4(a) of the Policy requires that Complainant must prove each of the following three elements to obtain an order that a domain name should be cancelled or transferred: (1) the domain name registered by Respondent is identical or confusingly similar to a trademark or service mark in which Complainant has rights; and (2) Respondent has no rights or legitimate interests in respect of the domain name; and (3) the domain name has been registered and is being used in bad faith.

In addressing the first element, the Panel recognized the trademark registrations for the MARY KAY mark and found that Complainant’s rights were established under Policy paragraph 4(a)(I). The Panel found that the disputed domain was a misspelled version of Complainant’s mark MARY KAY, with the r and y letters transposed. For this reason, the Panel found that MARY KAY satisfied the first element.

In addressing the second element, whether Respondent had any rights or legitimate interests in the domain, the Panel explained:

The relevant WHOIS information identifies the registrant of the disputed domain name as “Open Water Enterprises Limited c/o Louis S,” and there is no evidence in the record to suggest that Respondent is otherwise commonly known by the <mayrkay.com> domain name.  Therefore, the Panel finds that Respondent is not commonly known by the disputed domain name under Policy ¶ 4(c)(ii)….Respondent’s <mayrkay.com> domain name resolves to a website featuring click-through links and advertisements for Complainant’s competitors in the body care and cosmetics industry.  The Panel finds that Respondent’s use of the disputed domain name to redirect Internet users to Complainant’s competitors, presumably for financial gain, does not constitute a bona fide offering of goods or services or a legitimate noncommercial or fair use pursuant to Policy ¶¶ 4(c)(i) or (iii)….Respondent’s <mayrkay.com> domain name qualifies as typosquatting, given the transposition of two letters in the MARY KAY mark.  As such, Respondent’s attempt to capitalize on the typographical errors of Internet users constitutes evidence that Respondent lacks rights and legitimate interests in the disputed domain name under Policy ¶ 4(a)(ii).

Moving to the final element, bad faith, the Panel explained that Respondent had been involved in other prior UDRP proceedings and a pattern of bad faith registration has been established. Additionally, since the web site resolved to promote MARY KAY competitors via click-through links, it disrupted Complainant’s business. Further evidence of bad faith was from click through fees presumably generated from these links. Lastly, the Panel found that Respondent engaged in typosquatting.

For all these reasons, the Panel ordered the domain be TRANSFERRED.

RED ENVELOPE Buys Itself A Gift..A New Typosquatted Domain

Wednesday, November 11th, 2009

    redenvelope

In the recent domain name dispute of Provide Gifts, Inc. d/b/a RedEnvelope v. Privacy Ltd. Disclosed Agent for YOLAPT c/o Domain Admin FA1286921 (Nat. Arb. Forum, November 9, 2009) a single member Panel was faced with a dispute over the domain www.redenevelope.com. Complainant is the well known online gift retailer who maintains a web site at www.redenvelope.com. Respondent registered the disputed domain in August 2000 and failed to reply to the Complaint.

Paragraph 4(a) of the Policy requires that Complainant must prove each of the following three elements to obtain an order that a domain name should be cancelled or transferred: (1) the domain name registered by Respondent is identical or confusingly similar to a trademark or service mark in which Complainant has rights; and (2) Respondent has no rights or legitimate interests in respect of the domain name; and (3) the domain name has been registered and is being used in bad faith.

In addressing the first element the Panel noted that Complainant had rights to the RED ENVELOPE mark through various trademark registrations. The Panel found that the disputed domain contained a misspelled version of Complainant’s RED ENVELOPE mark which was confusingly similar. The Panel found that Complainant satisfied Policy paragraph 4(a)(i).
 
Moving to the second element, the Panel found that Red Envelope presented a prima facie case and that Respondent failed to submit a response. The Panel found that Respondent was not commonly known by the disputed domain, was using the domain to display links advertising third-party web sites in competition with Red Envelope, and engaged in typosquatting. All these factors culminated to a conclusion that Respondent lacked any rights or legitimate interests in the domain. The Panel found Red Envelope satisfied Policy paragraph 4(a)(ii).

In reviewing the third element, bad faith, the Panel began by explaining:

…Respondent intended to disrupt Complainant’s business and take advantage of Complainant’s goodwill surrounding its mark by displaying third-party links to Complainant’s competitors in the online retail industry for upscale gifts.  The Panel therefore finds that Respondent engaged in bad faith registration and use pursuant to Policy ¶ 4(b)(iii). 

The Panel also relied on another bad faith factor and explained:

Additionally, Respondent has created a substantial likelihood of confusion as to the source and affiliation of the <redenevelope.com> domain name and the corresponding website.  Respondent benefits from such a likelihood of confusion, as it receives referral fees for the competitive upscale gifts advertisements that are displayed to the diverted Internet users.  The Panel finds this to be adequate evidence of Respondent’s bad faith registration and use pursuant to Policy ¶ 4(b)(iv). 

The Panel didn’t stop there noting that the typosquating also qualified for proof of bad faith under Policy paragraph 4(a)(iii).

Ultimately, the Panel found that Red Envelope satisfied all elements of the ICANN UDRP Policy  and ordered the domain be TRANSFERRED.

Davidoff Extinguishes Squatter

Wednesday, September 9th, 2009

                  davidoff

In the recent domain name dispute decision of Davidoff & Cie SA v. Nicaragua Tobacco Imports, Inc. / Jorge Salazar (WIPO D2009-0923 August 20, 2009), a single member Panel was faced with a dispute over the domains www.davidoffcigarcutter.com, www.davidoffhumidor.com and www.davidoffhumidors.com. Complainant is the well known tobacco products company with a presence for nearly 100 years. They maintain a web site at www.davidoff.com. Respondent failed to respond to the complaint. Complainant has numerous trademark registrations for the DAVIDOFF mark.

The Panel provided one of the shortest decisions yet.  First, the Panel found that the domain names all incorporated Complainant’s full mark with the addition of generic words related to Complainant’s business. Second, the Panel found that there was no evidence of any right or legitimate interest in the domain by Respondent. Lastly, the Panel addressed the issue of bad faith. The Panel found that due to the long existence of Complainant and its use of the marks, the disputed domains could only have been registered in bad faith. Many of the links on the pages of the domains led to links of direct competitors with Complainant.

Ultimately, the Panel found that Complainant satisfied all elements of the Policy and ordered the domain be TRANSFERRED.

Re-Filed Case…Different Result

Tuesday, September 8th, 2009

                 koc

In the recent domain name dispute Koç Holding A.S. v. KEEP B.T. (WIPO D2009-0938, August 31, 2009) a single member arbitrator was faced with a dispute over the domain www.koc.com. As the decision points out, this appears to be re-filed case, after the complainant lost a previous decision back in December 2000 and decided in March 2001. See Koç Holding A.S. v. MarketWeb A.S., WIPO Case No. D2000-1764. In that prior decision Complainant failed to establish trademark rights. This complaint was now re-filed based on new evidence, including a trademark registration and subsequent bad acts. Although the rules don’t specifically address a re-hearing, many Panels have permitted it. WIPO has provided a short summary consensus view of re-filed cases:

A refiled case involves the complainant submitting a second complaint involving the same domain name(s) and the same respondent(s) as in an earlier complaint that had been denied. A refiled case may only be accepted in limited circumstances. These circumstances include when the complainant establishes in the complaint that relevant new actions have occurred since the original decision, or that a breach of natural justice or of due process has occurred, or that there was other serious misconduct by the panel or the parties in the original case (such as perjured evidence). A refiled complaint will also be accepted if it includes newly presented evidence that was unavailable to the complainant during the original case.

This Panel found there was sufficient evidence and allegations to support a re-filed case. Complainant is one of Turkey’s top industrial conglomerates, and has been around since 1926. It is ranked among the largest 200 companies in the world, and maintains a web site at www.koc.com.tr. The disputed domain was registered on August 12, 1997. Complainant owns a trademark registration for the KOC mark, with registration date of 2002, but with rights relating back to 1926.

In addressing the elements, the Panel made the following observations. First, with respect to whether the domina is identical or confusingly similar, the Panel explained that since Complainant proved it registered KOC as a trademark, there was no need for the Panel to consider the common law rights. Next, the Panel addressed whether Respondent had any rights or legitimate interests in the domain. The Panel found that Respondent was unable to show any rights or legitimate interests and that Complainant sufficiently presented a prima facie case. Third the Panel reviewed whether the domain was registered in bad faith. Complaianint submitted new allegations of bad faith, which included:

The Respondent received news and documents that were intended for the Complainant. After the previous case between the parties the Respondent was supposed to return all that was received to the Complainant but never did. The Respondent sent an e-mail that blackmailed the Complainant. The Complainant initiated legal proceedings which concluded in the Complainant’s favour….

The Panel merely states this information is germane to the instant decision, but does not provide additional analysis. Instead, the Panel found that due to the size of Complainant at the time of the registration of the disputed domain, and since Respondent also resided in Turkey, then Respondent must have known about Complainant. The Respondent’s passive holding of an inactive web site was also troubling to the Panel.

Ultimately, the Panel found that Complainant satisfied all the elements and ordered the domain be TRANSFERRED.

KILLER BROWNIE Delivers A Death Blow

Wednesday, August 19th, 2009

         killerbrownie

In the recent domain name dispute of Dorothy Lane Market v. Tony Chang FA1271237 (Nat. Arb. Forum August 18, 2009) a single member Panel was faced with a dispute over the domain www.killerbrownie.com. Complainant markets and sells a multilayed brownie called the KILLER BROWNIE. The maintain a web site at www.dorothylane.com and have a federal trademark registration for KILLER BROWNIE with rights dating back to at least 1988. Respondent registered the disputed domain in September 2006 and failed to respond to the dispute.

Paragraph 4(a) of the Policy requires that Complainant must prove each of the following three elements to obtain an order that a domain name should be cancelled or transferred: (1) the domain name registered by Respondent is identical or confusingly similar to a trademark or service mark in which Complainant has rights; and (2) Respondent has no rights or legitimate interests in respect of the domain name; and (3) the domain name has been registered and is being used in bad faith.

In addressing the first element, the Panel noted that the disputed domain contained all of complainant’s mark, with the omission of the space between the words and the addition of the generic top level domain “.com” The Panel found the domain was identical to Complainant’s mark.

Moving onto the second element, the Panel explained that although Complainant had shown a prima facie case, it would still review the record. The disputed domain resolved to a web site containing Respondent’s personal biography and resume. The Panel found “that Respondent’s use of the identical <killerbrownie.com> domain name, to divert Internet users to a website that is unrelated to Complainant’s KILLER BROWNIE mark, does not constitute a bona fide offering of goods or services or a legitimate noncommercial or fair use under Policy ¶ 4(c)(i) or (iii), respectively.” The Panel also noted that Respondent was not commonly know by the disputed domain.

Moving to the final element, bad faith, the Panel explained that under the Policy, “that it may look beyond the Policy ¶ 4(b) elements while considering a Policy ¶ 4(a)(iii) analysis, and may find bad faith registration and use from the totality of the circumstances under Policy ¶ 4(a)(iii).” The Panel found that there appeared to be no commercial use of the site, but that the disputed domain lends itself to the impression that there was a goal of confusion.

Ultimately, the Panel found that Complainant satisfied all elements of the Policy and ordered the domain be TRANSFERRED.

DefendMyDomain Commentary: At first blush, it is unclear why the Panel did not view Respondent’s use of a personal web site as fair use. Actual review of the disputed site may better answer that question. For instance, the site was purportedly registered by Respondent in 2006 yet it has a “2000-2008″ copyright notification on the site. Also it lists a different domain at the bottom, www.eliminated.org, which has the identical information. Therefore one can only assume there was never an intention to actually use the site as a blog, despite wording on the site to the contrary. Since the Panel decision did not mention any of these facts we cannot assume they were actually considered. If they weren’t considered, then we have concerns about the potential implications of this decision. As usual the world of domain disputes remains uncertain.

Roberto Cavalli Designs A Winning Arbitration

Monday, August 17th, 2009

In the recent domain name dispute decision of Roberto Cavalli S.p.A., IGA Finance B.V. v. Jekaterina Kaidanovits-Rogers (WIPO D2009-0740, August 5, 2009), a single member Panel was faced with a dispute over the domain www.robertocavalliusa.com. Complainant is the famous Italian designer and has trademark rights in the name ROBERTO CAVALLI. Cavalli maintains a web site at www.robertocavalli.com. Respondent failed to respond to the complaint.

             robertocavalli1

Paragraph 4(a) of the ICANN UDRP Policy states that Complainant must prove (i) the domain name is identical or confusingly similar to a trademark or service mark in which the complainant has rights; and (ii) respondent has no rights or legitimate interests in respect of the domain name; and (iii) the domain name has been registered and is being used in bad faith.

In addressing the first element, the Panel found that the disputed domain contained all of Complainant’s mark and merely added “usa” at the end. This was enough for the Panel to determine the domain was confusingly similar.

Moving to the second element, the Panel agreed with Complainant’s arguments which included:

(i) The Respondent has not been authorised by the Complainant to register nor to use the Complainant’s marks. (ii) The Respondent is not associated in any way with the Complainant or its distribution network. (iii) The Respondent has never been commonly known in the normal course of business by the trademark, trade name or domain name ROBERTO CAVALLI. (iv) There is no evidence of a bona fide noncommercial or other legitimate fair use by the Respondent.

The Panel found that Complainant provided sufficient unrebutted evidence and noted that the second element was satisfied.

Moving to the final element, bad faith, the Panel explained that Complainant’s evidence of the disputed domain showed it was being used for “promoting sales of Complainant’s products which appear to be paralell imported and may even be counterfeited.” In light of these findings the Panel found that Complainant satisfied this element as well.

Ultimately, the Panel agreed with Complainant and ordered the disputed domain be TRANSFERRED.

Big Law Firm Greenberg Traurig…Big Win…Did You Expect Anything Less?

Friday, August 14th, 2009

In the recent domain name dispute decision of Greenberg Traurig, LLP and Greenberg Traurig of New York, P.C. and Greenberg Traurig, P.A. v. Louis Zweifach FA1271922 (Nat. Arb. Forum, August 13, 2009), a single member Panel was faced with a dispute over the domain www.greenbergtraurigharassment.com. We all know who the law firm Greenberg Traurig, LLP is, so I won’t go into much detail about them. Complainant has a registered mark for GREENBERG TRAURIG and the decision notes that with over 1,800 attorneys worldwide, the law firm specializes in harassment, intellectual property and business law. If you want more information go to their web site at www.gtlaw.com. The respondent failed to respond to the Complaint.

Paragraph 4(a) of the Policy requires that Complainant must prove each of the following three elements to obtain an order that a domain name should be cancelled or transferred: (1) the domain name registered by Respondent is identical or confusingly similar to a trademark or service mark in which Complainant has rights; and (2) Respondent has no rights or legitimate interests in respect of the domain name; and (3) the domain name has been registered and is being used in bad faith.

In addressing the first element, the Panel noted that the domain name incorporated all of Complainant’s mark, and merely added the term harassment.

The term “harassment” refers to employment law and harassment lawsuits and thus, is descriptive of Complainant’s business.  The Panel concludes that these alterations are insufficient to negate a finding of confusing similarity pursuant to Policy ¶ 4(a)(i). 

The Panel found Complainant satisfied the first element.

Moving to the second element, whether Respondent had any right or legitimate interest in the domain, the Panel found that Complainant set out a prima facie case in accordance with Policy ¶ 4(a)(ii).  Since Respondent failed to reply this Panel noted that they may infer a lack of rights or legitimate interests. However, as most Panels often do, they still reviewed the evidence. The Panel explained:

The disputed domain name resolves to a website displaying click-through links that further resolve to the websites of Complainant’s competitors in the legal services industry.  Complainant contends , and the Panel agrees, that Respondent’s use of a confusingly similar domain name to redirect Internet users to a website displaying links to competing law firms is not a bona fide offering of goods or services or a legitimate noncommercial or fair use under Policy ¶¶ 4(c)(i) or (iii), respectively.

The Panel also found that Respondent was not commonly known by the disputed domain after reviewing the Whois records. As a result, the Panel found Complainant satisfied the second element as well.

Moving to the last element, the Panel noted that using the disputed domain to resolve to a web site which had click-through links was bad faith since they were in direct competition with Complainant. The use of the domain diverted consumers and disrupted Complainant’s business. The Panel found that Respondent was presumably collecting fees from the click-through links and such profit was also considered bad faith.
       
Ultimately, the Panel ordered the domain to be TRANSFERRED.

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